Knowledge @lert for Monday 2nd June

Reward and recognise to recruit, motivate and retain – a reward case study – NHS Employers 

Find out how University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust (UHL) developed a new reward strategy that aims to improve staff motivation and engagement by increasing understanding of UHL’s unique total reward offering.


Consultation On Revalidation And The Revised Code – Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC)

The NMC are currently seeking feedback and views on The Code which outlines the standards of conduct, performance and ethics for nurses and midwives. The Code has been revised following the recommendations of recent major healthcare reviews including the Francis Report. The revised Code will also align to revalidation, a process which will require all nurses and midwives to regularly confirm to the NMC that they are fit to practise. This consultation closes on 11th August 2014.

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Improving engagement with clincians on business decisions – Monitor 

Monitor is running a survey on how different healthcare providers engage with clinicians, with a specific focus on service line management and how this is organised. As well as improving our understanding of how the healthcare sector is organising itself and supporting clinical engagement with decision-making, Monitor will use the results to create new learning and support programmes. The survey shouldn’t take more than 20 minutes to complete and it closes on 6th June 2014.


Being a manager, becoming a professional? A case study and interview-based exploration of the use of management knowledge across communities of practice in health-care organisations – National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)

This study aimed to investigate how NHS middle managers encounter, adapt and apply management knowledge in their working practices and to examine the factors which may facilitate or impede the acceptance of new management knowledge and its integration with practice in health-care settings.


Seizing The Opportunity – Ten New Perspectives From Healthcare Leaders – Foundation Trust Network (FTN)

This publication sets out the achievements of the foundation trust model over the last decade, as well as some ideas for its future. It includes contributions from healthcare leaders across the sector.


Leadership: easier said than done – Chartered Institute of Personnel and Development (CIPD)

Considers the barriers to leadership and good people management in practice. The report’s insights are based on over 120 interviews and focus groups with managers, employees and HR practitioners in seven large organisations. The report identifies that, many organisations are now seeking to devolve leadership down the line, expecting more junior managers and employees without managerial responsibility to treat the organisational agenda as their own. It also finds a mismatch between the rhetoric of improving leadership capacity, and the organisational context (including people management systems and processes). Recommends that they give greater consideration to two sets of factors that impact on the ability of individuals to apply their skills in practice. Practitioners can make a greater difference by taking the next step from training individual leaders to improving the leadership capacity of the organisation as a whole, by focusing their efforts on understanding what leadership their organisation needs and whether the organisational context is aligned to support it.


Smaller trusts outperforming larger counterparts – HSJ

Smaller trusts are outperforming their larger counterparts on several measures, research by healthcare data company CHKS reveals.


Interview with Simon Stevens – NHS England

In his first two interviews with the Press since becoming NHS England’s new Chief Executive, Simon Stevens has stressed the need to think creatively about improved patient outcomes. He told the Daily Telegraph and Health Service Journal magazine that tailoring care models and solutions to the needs of different audiences is vital.


Efficiency and perceptions of cost in healthcare – British Journal of Healthcare Management

Are patients and healthcare professionals able to estimate the costs involved in delivering healthcare? Could a better awareness help to improve efficiency and effectiveness? This questionnaire-based study assessed whether those who deliver and those who receive healthcare are able to estimate the costs involved. The questionnaire asked the participants to estimate the costs for various items of healthcare. Of the 200 questionnaires distributed 122 were returned. An estimate that was either 5% above or below the actual price was accepted as being correct. Overall, 65% of responses were underestimates, 30% of responses were overestimates and 5% were correct. Overall, there was a highly significant trend towards underestimating costs. The proportion of over and under-estimates was similar between the different groups (doctors, nurses, other healthcare professionals and patients).
This resource requires an OpenAthens account you can register here from an NHS connected computer.


Developing collective leadership for health care – The King’s Fund

Key messages from this report are:

  • The most important determinant of the development and maintenance of an organisation’s culture is current and future leadership. Every interaction by every leader at every level shapes the emerging culture of an organisation.
  • Boards are responsible for ensuring their organisation develops a coherent, effective and forward-looking collective leadership strategy for their organisation and assuring themselves that it is implemented. This strategy comes from purposefully describing the leadership culture desired for that organisation.
  • Collective leadership means everyone taking responsibility for the success of the organisation as a whole – not just for their own jobs or work area. This contrasts with traditional approaches to leadership, which have focused on developing individual capability while neglecting the need for developing collective capability or embedding the development of leaders within the context of the organisation they are working in.
  • Collective leadership cultures are characterised by all staff focusing on continual learning and, through this, on the improvement of patient care. It requires high levels of dialogue, debate and discussion to achieve shared understanding about quality problems and solutions.
  • Collective leadership cultures are characterised by all staff focusing on continual learning and, through this, on the improvement of patient care. It requires high levels of dialogue, debate and discussion to achieve shared understanding about quality problems and solutions.

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National Care Of The Dying Audit Of Hospitals: National report – Royal College of Physicians (RCP)

This report has found significant variations in care across hospitals in England. The audit shows that major improvements need to be made to ensure better care for dying people, and better support for their families, carers, friends and those important to them. While previous audits had been based on the goals of care within the Liverpool Care Pathway for the Dying Patient (LCP), the new audit sampled the care of dying people in hospital, regardless of whether they were supported by the LCP or other care pathways or frameworks, and included more hospitals than the previous audits.
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Research launched into how healthcare providers structure their management

Monitor is running a survey on how different healthcare providers engage with clinicians, with a specific focus on service line management and how this is organised.  Improving engagement with clinicians on business decisions aims to improve Monitor’s understanding of how the healthcare sector is organising itself and supporting clinical engagement with decision-making.  Monitor will use the results to create new learning and support programmes.


Evidence update: Sickle cell acute painful episode

NICE has published a new evidence update Sickle cell acute painful episode. This update is a summary of selected new evidence relevant to NICE clinical guideline 143 ‘Sickle cell acute painful episode: management of an acute painful sickle cell episode in hospital’ (2012). Evidence updates are intended to increase awareness of new evidence they do not replace current NICE guidance and do not provide formal practice recommendations.


Specialist Pharmacy Services (SPS) – NHS England

Delivered by around 100 senior pharmacy professionals and primarily focused on hospital care SPS aim to underpin the safe, effective and efficient use of medicines across the country. This review, led by Dr Keith Ridge CBE, Chief Pharmaceutical Officer, sets out a way to provide SPS in a safe, sustainable and equitable manner. This letter contains the first steps towards this.


Caring for critically ill children in the community: a needs assessment – BMJ Quality and Safety 

This study identifies the need to fully understand the management realities of front-line caregivers of critically ill children in community hospital settings. It demonstrates the need to focus on the management of younger paediatric patients, technical skills development, practice of acute situations with less than optimal staffing resources, and access to facilitated real-world experiences with appropriate supervision and mentoring. Passive interventions such as web-based guidelines should not be used in isolation but as a support to ongoing exposure and engagement by content experts.


Developing A Sustainable Podiatry Workforce For The UK Towards 2030 – The College of Podiatry
Evidence to inform and influence organisations responsible for health workforce strategy, funding of under and post graduate education and service provision for Podiatry.


TA312 Multiple sclerosis (relapsing-remitting) – alemtuzumab: guidance – NICE Guideline

Alemtuzumab is recommended as a possible treatment for people with active relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis. What does this mean for the patient? If the patient has active relapsing–remitting multiple sclerosis, and their doctor thinks that alemtuzumab is the right treatment, you should be able to have the treatment on the NHS. Alemtuzumab should be available on the NHS within 3 months of the guidance being issued.
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TA313 Psoriatic arthritis (active) – ustekinumab: guidance – NICE Guideline

Ustekinumab (given by itself or with another drug called methotrexate) is not recommended for active psoriatic arthritis when treatment with non-biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (or DMARDs) has not worked well enough.

Ustekinumab should not normally be prescribed on the NHS for active psoriatic arthritis. Your doctor should talk to you about other treatment options available to you.

For patients already taking ustekinumab for active psoriatic arthritis, they should be able to continue taking it until you and your doctor decide it is the right time to stop.
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